Civil War Ancestors


Battle Flag

The 46th Infantry Regiment of Georgia, was formed during the spring of 1862 with men from Upson, Schley, Harris, Muscogee, Chattahoochee, Webster, Marion, and Talbot counties The unit served in Georgia, then South Carolina where it was involved in the conflicts at Secessionville, and Gaston and Frampton’s Plantation. In May, 1863, assigned to General Gist’s Brigade, it moved to Mississippi. After taking part in the siege of Jackson the regiment joined the Army of Tennessee and fought on many battlefields from Chickamauga to Atlanta, then saw action in Tennessee and North Carolina. In December, 1863, this unit totaled 628 men and 513 arms, but was greatly reduced when it surrendered on April 26, 1865. Its commanders were Colonels Peyton H. Colquitt and Samuel J. C. Dunlop,Lieutenant Colonel William A. Daniel, and Major A. M. Speer.

I don’t have a lot of information about my 3rd great grandfather. He served in the 46th Regiment, Co F, Webster County Invincibles.

McCall, Joseph — Private – March 4, 1862. Appointed 2nd Sergeant August 10, 1862. Sent to hospital February 23, 1864. No later record.

Below is a battle list of the 46th Georgia .

Vicksburg Campaign – May-July 1863
Jackson – May 14th 1863
Jackson Siege – July 1863
Chickamauga – Sept. 19-20,1863
Chattanooga Siege – Sept.-Nov. 1863
Atlanta Campaign – May-Sept. 1864
Dalton – May 5-11, 1864
Calhoun – May 1864
New Hope Church – May 25-June 4, 1864
Pine Hill – June 15, 1864
Kennesaw Mountain – June 27, 1864
Smyrna Campground – July 4, 1864
Chattahoochee River – July 5-17, 1864
Peach Tree Creek – July 20, 1864
Atlanta – July 22, 1864
Atlanta Siege – July-Sept. 1864
Jonesboro – August 31-Sept. 1, 1864
Franklin – Nov. 30, 1864
Nashville – Dec. 15-16, 1864
Carolinas Campaign – Feb.-April 1865

 Also, I have a story about a family member that states of his service in the battle of Kennesaw Mountain, where he was killed. Last muster roll states he was sent to hospital, Feb 23, 1864. It is difficult to locate Confederate graves, I can only find one in Oakland Cemetery in Atlanta. It is marked J. McCall confederate soldier.
Fold3 is a great place to find historical documents.

Advertisements

10 responses »

  1. Welcome to the GeneaBloggers family. Hope you find the association fruitful; I sure do. I have found it most stimulating, especially some of the Daily Themes.

    May you keep sharing your ancestor stories!

    Dr. Bill 😉
    http://drbilltellsancestorstories.blogspot.com/
    Author of “13 Ways to Tell Your Ancestor Stories” and family saga novels:
    “Back to the Homeplace” and “The Homeplace Revisited”
    http://thehomeplaceseries.blogspot.com/
    http://www.examiner.com/x-53135-Springfield-Genealogy-Examiner
    http://www.examiner.com/x-58285-Ozarks-Cultural-Heritage-Examiner

    Reply
    • Thank you so much for visiting. I appreciate someone of your extensive knowledge commenting on my blog and encouraging me to keep posting. It took some time at first to get started. Once you focus, it just comes.

      Reply
  2. Putting together what the regiment did like you have helps to understand what your ancestor was involved in. If he died during a battle he was most likely buried there then possibly later removed to an actual cemetery. Good luck on your search.
    Regards,
    Theresa (Tangled Trees)

    Reply
  3. I just found your blog through Geneabloggers. Welcome to the Geneablogger Family. I have three Civil War acnestors of my own. I love reading about the civil war.

    Regards, Jim

    Reply
  4. Rev. Matthew Jones

    I just came across your blog. In high school I reenacted in the 46th Georgia, Company F Webster Invincibles. I would recommend to you to attempt to contact Quinton King of Fayetteville, Ga. Three of his grandfathers fought in the 46th Georgia, one of which I believe was also killed at Kennesaw Mountain. I talked to him approximately three years ago, and he was still in good health. Last time I talked to him about the unit, he still had a great deal of information that he had personally done. Hope that this helps you in your search.

    Reply
  5. I have ancestors that fought in the 46th Georgia,inf and know that they fought at kolb farm at the battle of kennesaw Mountian. Most of the solders that died in the area were Barrie’s in the confederate cemetery in downtown Marietta, but it i possible that if he was moved to one of the atlanta hospitals he might have been buried in Oakland cemetery. The Marietta cemetery is not too far from my home

    Reply
  6. I would like to talk to you, my 3rd great granddad was in 46th co. B. I might could help you. Look me up on facebook if you can my name is Douglas Lee Martin.

    Reply
  7. Thanks for this little post!

    My 4th great-grandfather was William A Daniel, Lt Col of the regiment, originally enlisting into Company I. From my research, he’d originally enlisted into the 4th Georgia with two of his brothers but resigned in 1862 with one of them to form up with the 46th. The 3rd brother, John, tried to get leave from the 4th to join with them, but being a private, he was denied and went on to fight in Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and was finally killed at Wilderness.

    William was wounded at Jackson and was convalescing when Colonel Colquitt was killed at Chickamauga. Presumably, that put him in line to be his replacement, but he was denied for reasons that aren’t entirely clear. I have a copy of a letter of his sent to Jefferson Davis where he makes the case he was denied due to some alleged personal grudge held by Brigadier General Stevens, who was on the examination board for the appointment.

    It would appear the denial of the promotion affected him such because I’ve found a letter of resignation from the army just two months later in May, just as the Atlanta campaign was underway.

    I gotta say, this information is disappointing, but I’ve been so desperate to find a diary, picture, account that could shed further light on all this. I’m a Californian by birth and until I did all this genealogy, nobody in my family even knew we had ancestors from the Confederacy and it’s been a fascinating journey.

    How could you just back out when the enemy was on your very home soil. He was from Talbotton, but the vital nature of Atlanta’s defense doesn’t need to be explained to your readers.

    Ironically, as a side note, Lt Col William Daniel’s granddaughter would wind up married to the son of Pvt Andrew Danielson of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry, a unit in Sherman’s Army as they ripped through Georgia. Amazing stuff. I love doing family history.

    Thanks again!Thanks for this little post!

    My 4th great-grandfather was William A Daniel, Lt Col of the regiment, originally enlisting into Company I. From my research, he’d originally enlisted into the 4th Georgia with two of his brothers but resigned in 1862 with one of them to form up with the 46th. The 3rd brother, John, tried to get leave from the 4th to join with them, but being a private, he was denied and went on to fight in Antietam, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and was finally killed at Wilderness.

    William was wounded at Jackson and was convalescing when Colonel Colquitt was killed at Chickamauga. Presumably, that put him in line to be his replacement, but he was denied for reasons that aren’t entirely clear. I have a copy of a letter of his sent to Jefferson Davis where he makes the case he was denied due to some alleged personal grudge held by Brigadier General Stevens, who was on the examination board for the appointment.

    It would appear the denial of the promotion affected him such because I’ve found a letter of resignation from the army just two months later in May, just as the Atlanta campaign was underway.

    I gotta say, this information is disappointing, but I’ve been so desperate to find a diary, picture, account that could shed further light on all this. I’m a Californian by birth and until I did all this genealogy, nobody in my family even knew we had ancestors from the Confederacy and it’s been a fascinating journey.

    How could you just back out when the enemy was on your very home soil. He was from Talbotton, but the vital nature of Atlanta’s defense doesn’t need to be explained to your readers.

    Ironically, as a side note, Lt Col William Daniel’s granddaughter would wind up married to the son of Pvt Andrew Danielson of the 2nd Minnesota Infantry, a unit in Sherman’s Army as they ripped through Georgia. Amazing stuff. I love doing family history.

    Thanks again!

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: