Sentimental Sunday …..1427 1/2 Myrtle St


THIS IS THE HOUSE IN WHICH MY MOM GREW UP…..

1427 1/2 MYRTLE ST, FRANKLIN PA

I started visiting Franklin Pennsylvania when I was ten years old. At the top of the hill was Myrtle St.and Sassafras St., they met up in the bend of the road. The house sloped a bit, meaning it always felt like it was going to slide off the side of the hill into 15th street!! You walked into the living room at the back of the house, and there was a slant. At ten, I thought it was neat. . Upstairs, there were two bedrooms. And there was a narrow set of stairs that led up to them. At this time, my grandfather had not yet been moved downstairs for care. He later was, so grandmother could help him more easily. There were two large beds in the front bedroom which faced down onto the street.For some reason, I remember when it stormed, my grandmother did not like that. I did, and still do like sleeping during storms.

At the base of those stairs, there was also a large bathroom, my mother said had been converted some years ago. Plus side, a large claw foot tub, which I loved. There was a wringer washer too. I have many great memories of our visits.

My mom grew up here, along with her brother Albert. They would tell all kinds of stories about a runaway wagon, overturned outhouses and of the neighbors they knew from way back.

From this house, you could walk through the woods and get to the top of the mountain to Franklin Heights. From the top of the mountain, you could see all the way downtown to Franklin, one of my favorite views.

Soon after my grandmother moved in the apartment in downtown Franklin, the house was demolished. I see the door to the root cellar still there, I never went in it!!

Attached are some photos of the house when my mom was very young with the family, and some with her brother.

Family Photos

Advertisements

One response »

  1. It sounds like a fun house for kids–slanted floors and all. I always feel a little sad when home that family members once lived in are abandonned or demolished–even if they weren’t in particularly good condition.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: