Tag Archives: 1940 United States Census

STORIES OF MY MOTHER….PART 7

STORIES OF MY MOTHER….PART 7

A FEW YEARS AGO, MY MOTHER PUT DOWN ON PAPER, STORIES OF HER AND BROTHER ALBERT’S CHILDHOOD.

I am going to write these in her words. She has told me some of these stories, and some I am reading for the first time. My mother and family did not have much growing up in a small town, but, they did have loving parents, good times and stories that will endure.

It has been awhile since I posted anything else from  my mom’s stories she wrote. The last was finding her and grandmother in the 1940 census, along with the man who wold later become my mom’s father.

Grandparents

When we got older, Granddad ( Albert Ross Ewing ) would come pick us up. He had a 1931 Ford with a rumble seat. Al and I would sit back there. He would stop at Joe Guyton’s store, which was at the corner of 13th and Buffalo in Franklin,and he would buy us a candy bar. We never told Grandmother, and she never knew, or smelled it on us. On Saturday afternoon, he would take us back home. We didn’t go there a lot. Granddad always seemed to have a garden, and shared what he grew with us. Next to my grandparents home was a one room school that my mom  ( Blanch Ewing ) attended. My grandfather was very strict with the girls, but, no so much with the boys, Uncle Chuck, Wesley and Tom. They al lived in a small house with the three boys and five girls. It was on Congress Hill in the Sandycreek township. It happens to be that the very land they lived on while my grandmother was being raised, was the land all the male children divided to farm themselves. My Aunt Ruth and Uncle Tom lived in the old barn until they built a home of their own. And, he also farmed with a smaller garden, because, he had a regular job. The main road going there is Pone Lane to Congress Hill now there is a Ewing Lane….the name lives on in the land.

Albert Ross Ewing

Sandycreek township

Ethel Jones Ewing

Daddy’s father, lived in Canonsburg Pennsylvania. He was blind, and married to a lady that cooked food we didn’t like. This would be Charles W. Dean, on which I can’t find much information. He married Mary Vinton, that is about al the information that I have.  We did care a lot for our grandfather. One day our grandmother fried up Buckwheat pancakes and we did not like them. She told us if we didn’t eat them, we couldn’t go outside. When she left the room, uncle Frank came in and got the pancakes and fed them to the pigs. I bet they didn’t like them either. That was the longest week of our life Uncle Frank played the fiddle really good, which helped pass the time. Daddy had other relatives in Canonsburg too. Willard and his wife, McElheney and some others. I guess we went to visit on the bus. Daddy never drove, and we had no car. So, if we ever went on vacation, we would take the bus.

Dean family

I am currently trying to find the census records from this time frame now that the 1940 census is available. I have located a census from 1920 that have the McElheney family next door as well as the last name Cherry, I have heard this name mentioned before, Willard was a McElheney. I just found a Mary Vinton, in Warren county Pennsylvania. I have some family research that states bothe Mary and Charles W were born in Warren county. Now, to find him in a census. Mary Vinton’s father was Riley, it’s starting to add up ,right? I can’t tell you exactly who is who in the group photographs, only that they are Deans.

1920 , Cecil township, Washington county, Pa.

Still on the search for the rest so I can find siblings of Ruben, somewhere in Pennsylvania.

©FANNIESYOURAUNT

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1940 CENSUS, STORIES OF MY MOTHER….PART 6


A FEW YEARS AGO, MY MOTHER PUT DOWN ON PAPER, STORIES OF HER AND BROTHER ALBERT’S CHILDHOOD.

I am going to write these in her words. She has told me some of these stories, and some I am reading for the first time. My mother and family did not have much growing up in a small town, but, they did have loving parents, good times and stories that will endure.

A cousin, Geraldine Harkless had given my mom some notes about her remembrances of my mom’s childhood. They were trying to verify some information. These notes are in Geraldine’s words…

“I don’t remember your first baby days, probably because we were living in Virginia with our aunt Gerry. We lived at 1327 Eagle St in a large three-story house, mom had set up apartments to make a living. Our apartment was on the first floor. Uncle Ruben was our boarder. After Aunt Gerry brought us back, mom had rented our apartment, so we had to go back to Virginia until our place was vacated. When we came back, Blanche came to us as a caregiver. ”

I found in the 1940 census this very story. My mother was about 1 year old. That year, Blanche and Ruben married. She was 21 and he 52. She was an unwed mother at the time, living with family.

1940 census

Uncle Ruben as she called him, was the brother-in-law of Bill Harkless who married Kate Ewing. Kate’s daughters with Bill were Berneitha and Geraldine. Ruben’s wife Violet had died in 1930. Bill and Violet were siblings.

THE FINAL COUNTDOWN


19 DAYS TIL THE 1940 CENSUS……

Here is my list of people I will search in the 1940 census. Below are actual images that would have been around 1940 of the people for whom I will be searching.

Albert Ross Ewing and Ethel Letisia Ewing, my grandmother and mom may be living with them in Pennsylvania,  Venango county.

Mom

Great grandmother Alice Pickens, curious to see if Aunt Ruth and Uncle Jimmy are living with her in Tampa, Florida

My dad and his parents and sister Ann in Tampa Florida.

HERSHEL AND ANN PICKENS

My Aunt Edith would be about 15 then, with her mom Edith Duskin McCall and father Clifford R McCall in Plant City, Florida.

Finally, any remaining relatives in Irwin and Dougherty counties Georgia or maybe some in North Texas and south Oklahoma.

Good luck in your searches!!! Let me know who you find.

1940 CENSUS / Who Will You Search First?


Census records capture a day in the lives of your family every 10 years. And the U.S. government releases the census to the public exactly 72 years after it was taken. That means today, the most recent census record you can peruse is from 1930 – quickly approaching its 82nd birthday. But that will change this April when the 1940 census reaches the magic age of 72 years, too.

 

In 1790, the population in the first census taken in the United States, was 3,929,214. It was 123,202,624 in the 1930 census.

Most of the family I had been searching, and had no info on, were dead by the time the 1940 census would have been taken. Although, it wlil be interesting to find where some relatives lived at the time.

My most interesting census find…..neighbors in Irwin County Georgia, Homer Bankston and Josie Jeffers married. This was my great grandmother’s sister. They all lived in the same neighborhood it seems.

Homer and Josie Jeffers Bankston

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